THE CHANGING ROLE OF HUNTING IN SWEDEN-FROM SUBSISTENCE TO ECOSYSTEM STEWARDSHIP?

Sara Lindqvist, Camilla Sandström, Therese Bjärstig, Emma Kvastegård

Abstract


Although hunting served traditionally to supply game meat, and that is still important in Sweden, recreation is the most common reason for hunting moose (Alces alces) today. Hunting also serves an important management purpose in regulating moose populations to control crop and forest damage. This study used semi-structured interviews with key stakeholders and officials involved in the recently implemented ecosystem-based, adaptive local moose management system where hunters and landowners become environmental stewards responsible for managing moose in context with forest damage, vehicular collisions, large carnivores, and biodiversity. Our study found that participation and collaboration in reaching management objectives was perceived as positive by stakeholders, although their stewardship is jeopardized if specific management responsibilities are not clarified regarding monitoring. Further, it is important to find long-term funding solutions for monitoring activities that are critical for adequate data collection and to support the stakeholder role as steward. The importance of monitoring must be communicated to individual hunters and landowners to achieve an ecosystem-based moose management system that effectively incorporates both social and ecological values.


Keywords


adaptive, Alces alces, biodiversity, knowledge based, local management, monitoring, moose management areas

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